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Calendar 9:The Julian-1 Calendar

Julian-1 Calendar (calendar used from c. 13th Centuary A.D. and onwards, Number Change Day on January 1)

The Julian-1 Calendar is based on the Year of Reckoning based on the year Jesus Christ was conceived.

This can also be called the Julian-Christ-1 calendar

During the late Middle Ages, year ranges unknown, the days of the month came to be numbered in consecutive day order.

The calendar moved from the Kalends numbering system, which was a legacy of the days of the Roman Republican Calendars, of naming the days that counted down to the first day of the following month, the first quarter of the month, and the middle of the month, seen on the Julian-Kalends-1 calendar, to the method of counting up the days sequentially from one until the last day of the month, or the Countup method, or simply put, counting up the days since the previous month ended beginning with number one.

All of the dates between the Julian-Roman-1, Julian-Kalends-1 and Julian-1 Calendars line up with each other.

Number Change Day was January 1, hence the "-1" suffix in the name of the calendar design.

The Julian-1 calendar was also called the Julian Modern calendar

  1. Leap Year Rules:
    1. one leap day was added in February in every Julian-1 year that is divisible by four.
    2. the placement of the Leap Year Day was gradually moved from the day after Feb 23 (where it was called Feb 24 Posterior) to the day after Feb 28, taking on the date of February 29. For traditionalists, Feb 24 was the real Leap Year Day.

Variations of the Julian-1 Calendar

Julian-3-1-(minus) Calendar (Number Change Day on March 1)

  1. Year offset: exactly two months late in relation to year of Julian-1
  2. There was no year zero in this calendar

Julian-3-25-(minus) Calendar (Number Change Day on March 25)

  1. it was also called the Julian-Lady Day or Julian-Annunciation calendar
  2. Year offset: two months and 24 days late in relation to year of Julian-1
  3. There was no year zero in this calendar

The Julian-Easter+(plus) Calendar (Number Change Day on day before Easter Sunday)

  1. Year offset: eight to nine months early in relation to year of Julian-1 depending on when Easter fell.
  2. There was no year zero in this calendar
  3. In Easter Style dating, the new year started on Holy Saturday (the day before Easter), or sometimes on Good Friday.
  4. This was used all over Europe, but especially in France, from the eleventh to the sixteenth century.
  5. A disadvantage of this system was that because Easter was a movable feast the same date could occur twice in a year; the two occurrences were distinguished as "before Easter" and "after Easter".

The Julian-9-1+(plus) Calendar (Number Change Day on September 1)

  1. Year offset: exactly four months early in relation to year of Julian-1
  2. There was no year zero in this calendar

The Julian-12-25+(plus) Calendar (Number Change Day on December 25)

  1. It was also called the Julian-Christmas calendar
  2. Also called In Christmas Style or Nativity Style.
  3. Year offset: seven days early in relation to year of Julian-1
  4. There was no year zero in this calendar
  5. New Year Day was Dec 25 and the year number changed to the one the Julian-1 calendar would be using the following Jan 1.
  6. Dec 24, 1050 Julian-12-25+ was Dec 25, 1051 Julian-12-25+ the following day

Julian-Sweden Calendar (Number Change Day on January 1)

  1. A Short-Lived Calendar involving February 30 (Number Change Day on January 1)
  2. So did Finland? Very likely but I'm not sure.
  3. Note that Sweden already moved New Years Day to January 1 in 1559, so it used the Julian-1 method of the New Year date.
  4. Sweden planned to change from Julian to Gregorian gradually but confusion occurred and was dropped in 1712.
  5. It was to omit all leap year days from 1700 to 1740 inclusive until its calendar caught up with the Gregorian calendar.
  6. Because of the war, leap days were not omitted in the years 1704 and 1708, but was omitted in the year 1700.
  7. From March 1, 1700 (Swedish Date, which was Julian-1 Feb 29, 1700) until Feb 29, 1712 (Swedish Date, which was Julian-1 Feb 28, 1712), its calendar was off one day. To make up for the lag, the missing Feb 29, 1700 date was repurposed to be Feb 30, 1712 (Swedish Date, Feb 29, 1712 Julian-1 or March 11, 1712 Gregorian), followed by March 1, 1712 (Julian-1) or March 12, 1712 (Gregorian) as the Swedish calendar came to an end the day before.
  8. In 1753, Sweden went from the Julian-1 to the Gregorian calendar by omitting the last 11 days in February (Feb 18-28), so that when Feb 18, 1753 Julian-1 arrived, it was March 1, 1753 Gregorian. Feb 17, 1753 was the last day Sweden used the Julian-1 calendar.
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Calendar History Main Page Calendar 1: The Romulus Calendar I Calendar 2: The Republican Calendar I Calendar 3: The Republican Calendar II Calendar 4: The Republican Transitional Calendar Calendar 5: The Julian-Roman-Actual-1 Calendar Calendar 6: The Julian-Roman-Transitional-1 Calendar Calendar 7: The Julian-Roman-1 Calendar Calendar 8: The Julian-Kalends-1 Calendar Calendar 9: The Julian-1 Calendar Calendar 10: The Gregorian Calendar Dual Dating Date Confusion Definition of Days on the Calendars Definition of Calendars: Others Old, New and Unknown Styles Leap Year Error on the Julian-Roman-Actual-1 Calendar What Calendars Each Country Was Using Gregorian-Julian Differences By Century New Years Days Addenda Day and Year Measurements Calendar Varieties-Gregorian Calendar Varieties-Julian Calendar Varieties-Other Years Converted From Julian Period Day Lining Up Julian Dates Between Earth and Mars The Martian Calendar of Earth Converting From the Julian Period Date Creating a Julian Period Day Database File Truncating Answers Conversion Between Julian-1 and Gregorian Calendars Create a Calendar Leap Year Day Comparisons Swedish Calendar 1700-1712
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